Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

Kōrero, Enjoyment and Connection Influencing Factors of Bridge Design

Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge
Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge
Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge
Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

Project Credits

Client

Date Completed

Concept Design

Sector

Studio Wall

Awards
Project Lead

Brian Squair

Design Team
No items found.
Creating a central point of connection and bringing a diversity of communities together inspired Chow:Hill’s design of a pedestrian bridge that could enhance access to the Waikato region’s new theatre.

Cultural recognition, community connection  and a practical solution to pedestrian thoroughfare – this trifecta of design elements has influenced the proposed concept of Hamilton’s Kotahitanga Pedestrian and Cycling Bridge, esigned by Chow:Hill.

Commissioned by Rotary New Zealand to commemorate their organisation’s centenary in 2019, Chow:Hill’s unique design aims to bridge Hamilton’s eastern and western suburbs, currently separated by the Waikato River, and create a pathway to the region’s new theatre, set to be constructed in the city’s south end.

The proposed name, Kotahitanga, which means Coming together in unity, also acknowledges the impact Rotary has played in uniting New Zealand communities over the past century.

Instead of a direct pathway from one side of the river to the other, the curved design reflects the cultural journeys of tangata whenua and manuhiri, encouraging all to take their time when crossing, valuing encounters en route before continuing to their destination.

“The idea of this pedestrian bridge is that users enjoy the journey and dwell on the bridge, not merely pass over it like some basic outdoor corridor.”
~ Brian Squair, Director, Chow:Hill Architects

Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

Project Overview

Client

Status

Concept Design

Creating a central point of connection and bringing a diversity of communities together inspired Chow:Hill’s design of a pedestrian bridge that could enhance access to the Waikato region’s new theatre.

Cultural recognition, community connection  and a practical solution to pedestrian thoroughfare – this trifecta of design elements has influenced the proposed concept of Hamilton’s Kotahitanga Pedestrian and Cycling Bridge, esigned by Chow:Hill.

Commissioned by Rotary New Zealand to commemorate their organisation’s centenary in 2019, Chow:Hill’s unique design aims to bridge Hamilton’s eastern and western suburbs, currently separated by the Waikato River, and create a pathway to the region’s new theatre, set to be constructed in the city’s south end.

The proposed name, Kotahitanga, which means Coming together in unity, also acknowledges the impact Rotary has played in uniting New Zealand communities over the past century.

Instead of a direct pathway from one side of the river to the other, the curved design reflects the cultural journeys of tangata whenua and manuhiri, encouraging all to take their time when crossing, valuing encounters en route before continuing to their destination.

“The idea of this pedestrian bridge is that users enjoy the journey and dwell on the bridge, not merely pass over it like some basic outdoor corridor.”
~ Brian Squair, Director, Chow:Hill Architects

Kotahitanga Pedestrian BridgeKotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

The design sees the bridge touching the river, in recognition of a Māori ceremonial practice of touching the waiora for cleansing, a life-giving and sustaining practice necessary in bringing different people together.

Kotahitanga Pedestrian BridgeKotahitanga Pedestrian BridgeKotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

The Kotahitanga Pedestrian and Cycle Bridge is currently in the design concept phase while external funders are sought to make the project viable.

“At Chow:Hill, we believe in supporting our local community in a way that encourages connection. Through shaping our experiences in a public space, we are collaborating on the design of our city.”
~ Brian Squair, Director Chow:Hill Architects

Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

Project Credits

Client

Kotahitanga Pedestrian Bridge

Status

In Progress

Project Type

Studio Wall

Awards

 

Project Lead

Brian Squair

Design Team
No items found.

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